Cubbyhouses and teasets

  When I was about ten years old I used to play in a huge cubby in the back yard of our home. My brother, who was a couple of years younger than me, and I, used to set up the interior with rooms mimicking a real home. We created spaces for a kitchen, a lounge room, a bedroom, and a bathroom. In true playful fashion, as only a pretend home allows, we changed the floor plan at will, and

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My family piano

There’s not a lot in common between eggs and pianos. Except for the one in my lounge room. If the hens on my Nanna’s farm in the early 1900’s hadn’t been so productive there’d have been no eggs to sell, no money saved and logically, no piano. In my mind I can hear my grandmother, Nora Farrall playing the piano and singing hymns for Sunday Services and gatherings in the front room of her home. I believe was often joined

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In Honour of Patrick McGuinness

Always an emotional time, this year’s ANZAC Day took on a depth of meaning I’d hitherto not experienced. While always aware of those who paid the ultimate price, it was only recently that I learned about my great uncle, Patrick McGuinness who died as a result of critical wounds in Villers-Bretonneux, France. Peter Terpkos, my daughter’s partner, is a keen family historian focussing on those who served in the World Wars. He wrote the following article on Patrick McGuinness after

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Collection or Clutter?

How do you choose just one item from a collection of memorabilia to write about? That was my task recently. I’ve been absent from blog posts because I’ve been busy writing assignments for my latest unit in family history. I had to select one – just one item – from a house ‘littered’  (my dear family say cluttered) with family memorabilia and write its biography. Writing a formal essay is as challenging as writing fiction, getting the facts straight and

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